Bride Concerned over Weight Loss Clause in Her Soon-To-Be Husband’s Prenup

Bride Concerned over Weight Loss Clause in Her Soon-To-Be Husband’s Prenup

Prenups aren’t really a big deal anymore. People have been doing them since forever and they are becoming more and more common these days as couples get married later in life after already accumulating property and a career in their chosen field. So it’s no biggie. It is smart to protect your personal wealth and all your hard work in achieving it. No one’s arguing that.

But a bride-to-be has spotted a bit of a red flag after reading through her fiance’s prenuptial agreement, most notably the bit about her being required to lose her baby weight within 12 months of giving birth.

Huh. Righto. Nothing like starting off a marriage knowing exactly where your new husband stands with regards to your future physical appearance in the event of pregnancy.

The anonymous woman asked Reddit’s Legal Advice forum if the red flags she was seeing were something to be concerned about:

My fiance is a neurosurgeon and has been wonderfully successful in his field, so when he asked me for a prenup I wasn’t too surprised and I am all for them actually. So I did the standard procedure and sat down with my fiance’s father, whom is a lawyer, and he helped break it all down for me.

My fiance put a few odd clauses in our prenup, such as an infidelity clause so if I cheat on him, I walk away with basically nothing. Along with that, he put in a clause that stated that I have to lose any weight I gain after childbirth, at least 30lbs (13.6kgs) of it in the first year following childbirth; the oddest of them all to me is the compensation for children clause. I am not sure if I interpreted this correctly so anyone may correct me, but in the prenup my fiance mentioned that for every child I have for him, I get a chunk of money, which to me doesn’t sound legal but maybe it is?

My main question is are all these clauses enforceable in court? What makes any of them invalid? I haven’t signed yet and would like to get insight from someone other than my future father in law as I feel he may mislead me if his son were to benefit from it.

Getting your body back to “normal” (which may not even be entirely possible) after having a baby in a safe and healthy way can take between six to eight months, but could take much longer, especially if she falls pregnant again within a short period of time. How much pressure might this young mum be under to save her marriage? Ridiculous!

Following this particular bombshell, a huge number of the responses urged the woman to hire her own lawyer, someone who is NOT her father-in-law.

It was suggested that this bride prepare a prenup of her own, being sure to include her own weight expectations of her new husband.

“I would add to it that if the husband also gains 30 pounds and does not lose it within a year then it invalidates the requirement on her. It should be equal on both parties. Same thing with the cheating clause and any other rule,” one response read.

“If I were in your shoes, I’d want a counter clause saying that he needs to provide childcare and a personal trainer, nutritionist and chef to come to your home while you’re trying to meet his unrealistic expectations,” another added.

Sounds fair enough!

But I’m kinda interested in that cash payment for each child she presents to him as well — what’s all that about? I bet he’ll be insisting on DNA testing before coughing up the payment, too.

How is all this any way to start a marriage? It is understandable to want to protect your own assets and to include a cheating clause. But the cash payment for children and the weight loss aspect is definitely a red flag that I’m not sure I would like at all!

What about you? Would this bother you as well?

You can read the full thread over on Reddit here.

 

Source: Giphy

 

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